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Poroshenko called on international colleagues to increase pressure on Russia because of Umerov’s sentence
21:59, 27 September 2017
Poroshenko called on international colleagues to increase pressure on Russia because of Umerov’s sentence

The President called the sentence shameful, and Umerov – an unbreakable hero of his people

21:59, 27 September 2017

Facebook Petro Poroshenko

President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko called on international colleagues to increase pressure on Russia after Deputy Head of Crimean Tatar Meijlis Ilmi Umerov was convicted for two years.

“The shameful “sentence” against Ilmi Umerov. The unbreakable hero of his people, against whom Moscow used the worst means of the Soivet repressive mechanism – from punitive psychiatry to colonies. I am calling on my partners to jointly increase pressure on the Russian occupational power to stop persecuting Ukrainian citizens in Ukrainian Crimea,” the President wrote on Facebook

Related: Poroshenko convenes military cabinet over fire in Kalynivka

As it was reported earlier, the Court in occupied Crimea sentenced Ilmi Umerov for two years in prison

Ilmi Umerov was arrested by Russian authorities on May 12, 2014 after protesting illegal Russian occupation of the Crimean Peninsula and the repression of native Crimean Tatars. For publicly speaking out against Russia’s illegal occupation, Russian authorities have charged Mr. Umerov with “public calls to action aimed at violating Russian territorial integrity,” which can carry a prison sentence of five years. More alarmingly, in August 2016, Russian authorities took Mr. Umerov to Psychiatric Hospital No. 1 in Simferopol, where he was held against his will.

In September 2016, the highly-ranked Crimean Tatar official has been released from the psychiatric clinic. It was proved that he is mentally sane.

Related: G7 can become platform in issue of Crimean de-occupation, - Poroshenko

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