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NASA gets photo of most distant solar system object

The scientists will explore the information received from the probe
12:39, 4 January 2019

Ultima Thule, the most distant object ever explored in the space
NASA

NASA got the first photo of an interplanetary probe “New Horizons”, which flew by the most remote object of the solar system, as BBC reported.

“The device managed to take a photo of the surface of the asteroid (486958) 2014 MU69. It is located beyond the orbit of Neptune known as Ultima Thule. These are the first pictures of this asteroid,” the message says.

Related: NASA explores Ultima Thule, the most distant object ever explored in space

It appeared that the asteroid consists of two elements connected with each other and it resembles a snowman.

The representatives of NASA confirmed that after flying by the glacial asteroid the probe remained in a working condition. The device was placed in the space 12 years ago.

Related: NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft enters interstellar space

“This is exactly what we need to move the modeling work on planetary formation forward. Ultima is telling us about our evolutionary history," The Washington Post cites Cathy Olkin, the mission’s deputy project scientist. 

Ultima Thule is located in the so-called Kuiper Belt – the third layer of the Solar system after the belt of the internal planets and the belt of external gas giants.

"Jeff Moore, the leader of the New Horizons geology team, said Ultima Thule probably formed in the first few million years of the solar system from a swirl of smaller objects. Over time, dust and pebbles clumped together to form the object’s two lobes, which eventually combined to form a single body," The Washington Post wrote. 

Topics:
Система Orphus

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