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Captured Ukrainian sailors are fine, - lawyer

Their condition is stable and satisfactory, Yevheniya Zakrevska reports
12:15, 6 December 2018

Confrontation between Russian and Ukrainian military vessels, November 25, 2018
TASS

Three Ukrainian sailors who were injured during Russia’s attack on the Ukrainian vessels near Kerch Strait are at a hospital of Moscow remand prison No. 1, also known as Matrosskaya Tishina. Lawyer Yevheniya Zakrevska said this referring to Pavlo Pyatnytski, the member of Moscow Public Monitoring Commission for control of civil rights in places of detention, as Hromadske reported.

It was informed that two servicemen had to wear a cast, as during Russia’s attack they sustained shrapnel wounds.

Related: POW status implies 'special' model for releasing Ukrainian seamen, - Ombudsman

“Doctors put bandages on their injuries and put the IVUs. The administration of the prison gave them winter clothes and footwear, clean bed cloths… The wounded are satisfied with the nutritional status, they don’t have any complaints against the doctors and investigators of Moscow Federal Penitentiary Service,” Zakrevska said.

Vasyl Soroka, the officer of counter-intelligence of Ukraine’s Security Service, who sustained a shrapnel wound to his arm is in an isolated cell.

Related: 24 Ukrainian POWs moved from Crimea as European Court of Human Rights demands answers from Russia

Andriy Eyder has a shrapnel wound on his leg. Allegedly, his two cellmates help him go for a walk. Besides, Eyder uses a cane.

The third wounded sailor is Andriy Artymenko, who is also in a cell with two neighbors. He has a shrapnel injury of the arm; the whites of his eyes are damaged as well.

Related: 'I'm fine, don't worry', arrested Ukrainian sailor writes in note for his family

“The therapist, surgeon, neurologist and infectionist examined each of them, right after they arrived. They passed the ECG, the ultrasound diagnostics and got tested. On December 3, an optician examined Artemenko… The hospital chief says their condition is stable and satisfactory,” the lawyer cited Pyatnytski.

As we reported earlier, the coast guard ships of the Russian Navy acted aggressively against the ships of the Ukrainian Navy, which have been carrying out a scheduled transition from Odesa port to Mariupol port in the Sea of Azov.   

Related: 21 sailors delivered to Moscow remand center, three more to prison hospital

‘Today, November 25, the ships of the Ukrainian Navy with two armored gunboats and a sea mule tugboat have been carrying out a scheduled transition from Odesa port to Mariupol port in the Sea of Azov. The intention to make the transition was informed in advance in accordance with international standards in order to ensure the safety of navigation. However, contrary to the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea and the Treaty between Ukraine and the Russian Federation on cooperation in the use of the Sea of Azov and the Kerch Strait, the Russian coast guard ships - Sobol class patrol boat, Don border guard cruiser, Mangust class patrol boat and Suzdalets anti-submarine warfare ship performed blatantly aggressive acts against the ships of the Ukrainian Navy,’ reads the message. 

It is specified that Don border guard cruiser rammed the Ukrainian armored artillery boat, which led to the damage of the main engine, planting and accommodation rail, life float is lost. The Ukrainian Navy states that "the dispatcher service of the occupiers refuses to ensure the right of freedom of navigation, guaranteed by international agreements. 

Related: Almost 300 Ukrainian sailors held in detention abroad, - Foreign Ministry

The Ukrainian Navy states that "the dispatcher service of the occupiers refuses to ensure the right of freedom of navigation, guaranteed by international agreements." Thus, according to the Ukrainian side, Russia has once again demonstrated its aggressive nature and complete disregard for the norms of international law. 

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