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Zelensky’s chief of staff allegedly pressured judge of Constitutional Court to issue ruling favoring Yanukovych

Andriy Bohdan allegedly pressured Petro Stetsyuk to issue a ruling to help Yanukovych monopolize power
14:15, 9 October 2019

www.kyivpost.com

Former judge of Constitutional Court top judge Petro Stetsyuk testified that Andriy Bohdan, the current head of Ukraine’s Office of President, put illegal pressure on him back in 2010, when Bohdan worked in the government under then-President Viktor Yanukovych. Two sources, appealling to the official testimony given by the ex-judge in a related criminal case, said that on condition of anonymity because the materials of the case are classified, KyivPost reported.

Andriy Bohdan allegedly pressured Petro Stetsyuk to issue a ruling to help Yanukovych monopolize power, two sources told the Kyiv Post, citing official testimony given by the ex-judge in a related criminal case.

According to KyivPost, Andriy Bohdan called Stetsyuk’s accusation a “lie.”

Stetsyuk did not succumb to the alleged pressure and voted against the decision, writing a dissenting opinion, but the ruling was adopted anyway.

However an ex-judge of the Constitutional Court, Vyacheslav Dzhun, told the Kyiv Post that he had also been pressured to support the ruling on opposition lawmakers in 2010. He said he can’t disclose who pressured him because this information is sensitive to the ongoing criminal case. He said Bohdan wasn’t involved.

Viktor Shishkin, also an ex-judge of the Constitutional Court, also told the Liga news site in 2015 that members of the court had been pressured by Yanukovych’s administration to issue the rulings that helped him monopolize power. He didn’t answer to a request to comment for this story.

Former Constitutional Court Judge Ivan Dombrovsky, disloyal to Yanukovych, told the Kyiv Post he had not known Bohdan before 2019 but did not want to comment on alleged pressure by any officials.

The testimony accusing Bohdan of pressuring a judge to benefit Yanukovych was made when Bohdan was a private lawyer.

As it was reported earlier, Andriy Bohdan, former Zelensky’s Adviser on legal issues, is the head of the Office of the President of Ukraine. Being born in Lviv, Western Ukraine, Bohdan began his career as a lawyer in Pravis legal firm and a judge assistant in Kyiv Court of Appeal in 2001.

In 2007 he ran for election as a member of the Our Ukraine–People's Self-Defense Bloc, whose leader Yury Lutsenko, acted in courts on behalf of the Bloc’s informal leader President Viktor Yushchenko

Since December 2007, he worked as Deputy Minister of Justice of Ukraine Mykola Onyshchuk, enabling the implementation of state legal policy in anticorruption efforts.

Andriy Bohdan was appointed a government’s anticorruption commissioner twice – in 2010 and 2013.

In 2014, he became an adviser to the ex-governor of the Dnipropetrovsk region Ihor Kolomoisky.

And in the fall of 2014, he ran for the second time for the Verkhovna Rada, but in lists of Petro Poroshenko Bloc this time. However, failing to become an MP again, because the party canceled his registration as a candidate. In 2018, Andrei Bogdan appealed this decision in court, but got the null results.

Related: NABU intends to call Bohdan and Klitschko for questioning, - media

Since the beginning of the 2019 presidential campaign, Andriy Bohdan became a legal adviser to the campaign of Volodymyr Zelensky in the presidential race. On May 21, 2019, President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky appointed Andriy Bohdan as head of the Presidential Administration, which was later reorganized and downsized and renamed as the Office of the President.

On August 1, Interfax-Ukraine reported that Andriy Bohdan, the Head of the Office of President of Ukraine filed the resignation letter - on his own request, though he never resided.

Related: Giuliani claims State Department advised him to avoid Bohdan, - BuzzFeed

 

 

 

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