Poroshenko starts Year of Japan in Ukraine

He hopes it will contribute to rapprochement of cultures and peoples, and will strengthen interpersonal contacts

17:30, 11 January 2017

112 Agency

President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko has signed a decree on celebrating the Year of Japan in Ukraine during the meeting with Japanese Ambassador Shigeki Summe and expressed his gratitude for Japan's continuing strong support for the independence and territorial integrity of Ukraine that this country has consistently demonstrated. The press service of the Head of State reports this.

"It is very symbolic that the Year of Japan in Ukraine will take place in the twenty-fifth anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between our countries", the President said.

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The Head of State expressed confidence that this unprecedented event will be a milestone in Ukrainian-Japanese bilateral relations and will contribute to the rapprochement of cultures and people, enhance interpersonal contacts.

In turn, the Ambassador of Japan in Ukraine Shigeki Summa thanked the President for the high recognition of the role of his country, confirmed by carrying out the Year of Japan in Ukraine.

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"This is a very important moment for the relationships between Japan and Ukraine. They have never been as close as they are today", said the ambassador. He also noted that "the celebration of the Year of Japan is not only important for politicians or businessmen, but also for ordinary people who feel and understand the importance of cooperation between the two countries." The Ambassador also noted the symbolic meaning of the fact that "the significant number of large Japanese companies began their active economic activities in Ukraine after Euromaidan".

"If large companies have begun to invest in Ukraine, it means that other companies will invest in your country too", said Shigeki Summa.

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