Georgian plan on reintegration of the occupied territories

Author : Gela Vasadze

Commentary of Georgian political scientist Gela Vasadze on the 9th anniversary of the Russo-Georgian war

19:20, 8 August 2017

Read the original text at 112.ua.

President of Georgia (press office)

Georgia consistently pursues a policy of explaining that Russia is an occupier, it has occupied two regions of Georgia. Naturally, Georgia does not have enough military resources to return these territories, but at the same time, Georgia is doing everything possible in the diplomatic field, so that this status of the occupied territories was recognized by the whole world.

Related: Georgians mark ninth anniversary of Russia-Georgia conflict

If we take resolutions on these regions, then from year to year the number of countries voting against Russia and for Georgia on this issue is growing. I believe that this is a great merit of our diplomatic corps. At the same time, we must take into account the fact that Russia with its own hands has put itself in such a situation. Naturally, Georgia's support in this matter has also grown because more countries begin to see the real face of Russia's foreign policy today.

Related: 9 years after Russo-Georgian War

The strategy for the return of the occupied territories is fairly simple. We understand that it is now impossible to return these territories by military means. Thus, we are talking about how true this strategy is, on the integration of the population of these territories. The local population receives free medical care and can enjoy any benefits. Moreover, Georgia has two state languages, Georgian and Abkhaz. How effective is this integration policy? It is ineffective, because the propaganda machine is working so seriously that the population of the occupied territories, non-ethnic Georgians, is quite hostile to Georgia.

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Speaking about the options of returning the territory, I think that it is impossible to return the territories without a systemic crisis in Russia, which will come sooner or later. Moscow should stop interfering in Georgia's internal affairs. But as soon as this crisis comes (judging by many factors this might happen soon), Georgian authorities should have a very clear plan for the return of the territories. How this will happen is a matter for the future.